A Reminder About Helpful Links

Be sure to check out the helpful links posted on both sides of the page!
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Monday, April 23, 2012

Weeks 32 & 33

Opportunities

PrepMe, a new web-based SAT prep program, is now available on Family Connections of your Naviance homepage.  Simply click on the link to the left of the page and you'll be brought to the site.  The EOS Guidance Department has arranged for a free-trial period for time to evaluate the utility of the program.  Students are encouraged to log in and experiment with it.  The free trial program is available through August.

CHESLA was created by the State of Connecticut in 1982 to help students and families afford the costs of a college education by reducing the financial burdens of borrowing.  Check out CHESLA’s updated website. It includes information on paying for college, financial aid, and the lending process. Learn about Connecticut’s alternative source of low interest fixed rate loan funding and link to the application. www.chesla.org.

The annual New England Student Leadership Conference at Stonehill College that is sponsored by the CIAC and other N.E. state associations will take place from July 19-22. This program is designed to serve high school students involved in leadership roles with their clubs and/or sports teams. For more information, click on New England Student Leadership Conference.

The Longfellow Mountains Young Writers Workshop is being offered in Farmington, Maine. Students will have the opportunity to work with BFA faculty and other published authors in small supportive workshops focusing on Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction and Screenwriting. Evenings will be spent at readings and doing writing activities with Senior BFA students who will also serve as Resident Assistants. The dates of this year's conference are July 15-21st 2012. The deadline for regular registration is May 15. Cost of the workshop, room and board is 750 dollars for the week. For more information and for application forms please visit Young Writers Workshop.

Young Arts is a program devoted to encouraging and recognizing artistic excellence in the visual, literary, and performing arts.  The program also encourages to pursue careers in the arts.  Students entering grades 10-12, or who are 15-18, should visit Young Arts to learn more about the program and application process.

UConn Announces Changes in Admissions Process

The University of Connecticut's Admissions Office has announced policy changes regarding application deadlines and the application itself.  Beginning with Fall 2013 freshmen applicants, UConn's deadline for admission will be January 15, 2013.  UConn will begin notifying applicants on March 1, 2013.  In effect, UConn is eliminating the early action option (December 1) and establishing its regular decision deadline a couple of weeks earlier than in the past.  In addition, UConn will no longer maintain two applications after the Fall 2012 semester.  Instead, the university will go exclusively with the Common Application.  The link to this application will be available on the UConn website.

Schedule for Advanced Placement Exams

The 2012 schedule for Advanced Placement may be found by clicking on AP Exam Dates.  If you need more information, contact the EOS Guidance Department.

Is Bullying a Myth?

Bullying: Is the crisis a myth?
A Piece Recently Appearing in "the Week"

An epidemic of bullying has taken over our schools, said Claudia Puig
in USA Today. More than 13 million children and teens this year will
be subjected to heart-breaking cruelty, gay bashing, and harassment.
That’s the message of the documentary Bully, which opened last week
amid controversy over its “disturbing” content, rough language, and R
rating, which prevents kids under 17 from seeing it. The film follows
five children who are taunted and even physically abused, while school
officials fail to recognize the “dire and insidious problem” that is
all around them. Digital technology has extended bullies’ reach right
into the victims’ homes, said Zorianna Kit in Reuters.com, where they
are tormented 24/7. As a result, untold numbers of shy or “different”
young people suffer from shattered self-esteem and depression; some,
like Rutgers’s Tyler Clementi, even commit suicide.

This “bullying crisis” is largely a myth, said Nick Gillespie in The
Wall Street Journal. Studies show that by most standards, kids today
are “safer and better-behaved than they were when I was growing up in
the 1970s and ’80s.” Adolescent mortality, accidents, sex, and drug
use are all down from their levels of a few decades ago. Acceptance of
homosexuality is up, and the percentage of students who reported
“being afraid of attack or harm at school” has declined from 12
percent in 1995 to 4 percent in 2009. This crisis has been ginned up,
because now that schools are “peanut-free, latex-free, and soda-free,
parents, administrators, and teachers have got to worry about
something.”

Easy for you to say, said high school student Katy Butler in
TheDailyBeast.com. When I came out as a lesbian in middle school in
Plymouth, Mich., my entire class of 200 turned against me. Kids pushed
me up against walls, and called me fag and dyke. One bully “slammed my
hand into a locker” and broke my finger. Students all across Michigan
have told stories like mine; nationwide, 43 percent of teens say
they’ve been bullied, and 160,000 kids stay home from school every day
rather than face their bullies. As the movie Bully demonstrates so
powerfully, this is not a mythical epidemic, said Mike Huckabee, also
in TheDaily
Beast.com, nor is the fight against school bullying a liberal or
conservative cause. Surely we can all agree that at school or on the
Internet, “no child should be subjected to harassment, humiliation, or
violence.”


Recently Published Articles Worth Noting

Stop Telling Students to Study for Exams from the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Debating the Coming Personalization of Higher Education from the Chronicle of Higher Education







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