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Thursday, December 1, 2016

12/01/2016

UConn Courses On Campus for Second Semester


Students interested in taking a course on the UConn campus during the second semester should contact Doug Melody.  Preliminary registration has begun, although formal registration will be completed in mid-January.

For those students taking UC MATH 2410 (Differential Equations),be advised that the section available for EOS students is scheduled to take place on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:30-7:45 PM.                               


MCC Career Pathways ID Cards Available


Students enrolled in at least one MCC/CCP course at EOSHS and who have successfully registered through the MCC portal have been assigned student numbers (referred to as a "Banner" number by MCC).  These numbers appear on student identification cards that will be mailed home in the next week.  

For those wishing to immediately access information about MCC and the College Career Pathways student page, click here.

Students enrolled in MCC/CCP courses who may have missed the first registration deadline will have one last opportunity to register in late January.  More information about this will be made available in the weeks ahead.

UConn Applications Are Due on January 15


Applying to UConn?  Applications are due and must be submitted to the UConn Admissions Office by January 15th.  Students should make transcript requests in the EOS Guidance Office by January 10th.

PSAT Score Reports Arriving Soon


The College Board is reporting that PSAT Score Reports for students who completed the assessment in October will become available on December 12.  Students will be able to access their scores online at that time.  Paper score reports will be made available on December 19.

More information about this will follow when it becomes available.

The Power of Yet


You learn about attributions in Psychology 101 - that we all look to attribute explanations for outcomes that we experience in our lives.  Here's a very simplistic explanation of attributional theory - we believe that the successes and failures we experience are the results of luck (here's where superstitions play a huge role), task difficulty (Oh, I succeeded because it was too easy - or I didn't because it was too hard), ability (I'm not good enough - or I am good enough), and effort (I didn't try hard enough - or I tried really hard at it).  If you're wondering - "How about if I just don't care?" - well, this has to do with effort.  Doesn't it?  Although, it may be that some don't care because they don't think they have what it takes (ability) to care.

There's much to be said about how people assign reasons for what they experience in their lives.  Think about it - failing at something because you believe you aren't good enough (ability) is different from failing because you didn't try hard enough (effort).  In the latter case, you can do something about it - you can try harder.  

We've heard this phrase expressed repeatedly - "Forget it.  I can't do that."  Okay.  Maybe not - yet.  Yet. What if we added that three-letter word to the end of our judgments - yet?  "Yet" can change everything.  It can empower us to keep on keepin' on in pursuit of those goals we're otherwise so quick to discard. "Yet" changes the perception of "failure" from a sense of permanence to one that is temporary.  "Yet" extinguishes excuses.  "Yet" connotes choice. "Yet" tells us that it's a judgment in the moment and not one that is absolute.  "I can't do that - yet."  From an attributional standpoint, this is about effort.

Think about it.  Think about something you want to do or wanted to do but didn't.  Perhaps it's losing x amount of pounds or running an x minute mile or learning a new software program or joining a new club  - or all of these.  Perhaps it's writing a research paper or solving a math problem or doing homework daily.  It's December 1st.  Now think forward to April 1st.  And you haven't done what you set out to do.  Don't fool yourself by saying - "I give up.  I can't do that."  Instead, give up the first sentence in the previous phrase and add one word to the second sentence - "I can't do that YET."  Hope remains alive...and so should your commitment.  There may be goals we can't reach or behaviors we can't master no matter what, but not nearly as many as we think.  Rather, we simply can't do them yet.   

If you're old enough, you may remember the three "Rs" as Reading, 'Riting, and 'Rithmetic.  Each still has its place in learning, but so does another set of "Rs" - Relationships, Relevance, and Resilience.  It's this last one that deserves our attention in this piece.  Resilience is about belief.  And belief is related to effort.

If you want research to back this up, then you should make the effort to read Can Everyone Be Smart at Everything?

You can also click here for a short video of Carol Dweck - author of "Growth Mindset" - talking about how to raise resilient children.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

11/15/2016

Financial Aid Workshop for Parents 

 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17


The EOSHS Guidance Department has scheduled a financial aid workshop at 7 pm on Thursday, NOVEMBER 17th in the school auditorium.  A representative from the Barnum Group, a financial organization that specializes in the financial aid process, will present information about the FAFSA, how the financial aid system can work for families, how colleges use tuition discounting as a tool in the admissions process, and how the CSS Profile differs from the FAFSA.  Additionally, time will be devoted for the representative to address questions from parents/guardians in attendance.

This workshop may be beneficial for parents/guardians of students in the lower grades (9, 10, 11) as well as for those who have seniors going through the college admissions process this year.

Careers in the Middle
MCC recently offered a program on its campus called "Careers in the Middle" and it's purpose was to present information about promising careers that require less than a four-year degree.  Careers in health care and manufacturing were featured as these two areas appear to offer the most potential for employment opportunities in the decade ahead.  Other useful links mentioned during the conference are listed below.

Connecticut State Colleges and Universities

Still other opportunities were promoted in a recent presentation on the aerospace industry.  Employment opportunities are available for those who may wish to seek certification degrees that will prepare individuals to take advantage of these opportunities.  Click here to read a story recently appearing in the Hartford Courant.

Finally, the Hartford (CT) Electricians Association is offering an open house on December 2nd from 4-7 pm.  This is an opportunity to speak with representatives and learn more about the profession as well as what it takes to become an apprentice.  For more information, call 860.525.5982 or email cbrown@jatc35.org.  

A Reminder About Rolling Admissions at CT Public Universities

The CT public universities - CCSU, ECSU, SCSU, WCSU - offer admission on a rolling basis, meaning that these schools accept qualified students throughout the year. It means NOW. Students (and parents/guardians) should know that these schools have become more attractive in recent years for several reasons - not the least of which is the "price tag".  

A few years ago, SCSU closed its "doors" to applicants in March of the application cycle. This was much earlier than ever before. So, it becomes increasingly more difficult to be admitted as one waits longer to submit applications to these schools.  

College Matriculation - Class of 2016


Below is a list of colleges (in alphabetical order) to which students from the Class of 2016 matriculated for this school year.  The number in parentheses indicated how many students enrolled in that school.  The percentages to the right reflect 4- and 6-year graduation rates.

Becker College (17%/28%)
Berklee College of Music ((45%/58%)
Boston College (2) (89%/92%)
Boston University (2) (80%/85%)
Bowdoin College (88%/93%)
Brandeis University (80%/86%)
Brown University (2) (83%/96%)
Central CT State University ((9) (25%/57%)
Clemson University (58%/81%)
Coastal Carolina University (26%/43%)
Dickinson College (81%/85%)
Duke University (2) (87%/95%)
East Carolina University (35%/62%)
Eastern CT State University (21) (44%/56%)
Emerson College (78%/80%)
Emmanuel College (56%/64%)
Florida Gulf University (22%/43%)
Full Sail University (43%/43%)
Goucher College (57%/69%)
Hofstra University (49%/60%)
Ithaca College (69%/76%)
James Madison University (66%/83%)
Johnson & Wales University (32%/41%)
Keene State College (2) (53%/63%)
Kent State University (32%/56%)
Maine College of Art (64%/67%)
Manchester Community College (19) (5%/18%)
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (34%/52%)
Middlebury College (87%/94%)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (82%/92%)
Moody Bible Institute (59%/69%)
Mount Ida College (2) (31%/40%)
Naugatuck Valley Community College (5%/14%)
Pace University (37%/53%)
Plymouth State University (44%/58%)
Queens University-Charlotte (46%/53%)
Quinebaug Valley Community College (6) (9%/16%)
Rhode Island College (14%/44%)
Rice University (80%/91%)
Rider University (54%/64%)
Renssalaer  Polytechnic Institute (63%/81%)
Sacred Heart University (58%/64%)
Saint Joseph's University (72%/79%)
Saint Leo University (31%/42%)
School of Visual Arts (3) (62%/69%)
Sierra Nevada College (27%/41%)
Southern CT State University (4) (23%/52%)
Springfield College (2) (63%/72%)
St. Lawrence University (82%/87%)
Suffolk University (41%/56%)
Three Rivers Community College (5%/15%)
Unity College (4) (46%/54%)
University of Connecticut (38) (70%83%)
University of Massachusetts (66%/78%)
University of California-Berkeley (73%/92%)
University of Hartford (49%/60%)
University of Kentucky (35%/61%)
University of Maine (2) (33%/55%)
University of New England (60%/65%)
University of New Hampshire (63%/80%)
University of New Haven (44%/54%)
University of Northwestern Ohio (29%/40%)
University of Pittsburgh (64%/82%)
University of Rhode Island (3) (44%/63%)
University of Southern Maine (13%/33%)
University of Vermont (2) (66%/77%)
University of Wisconsin (56%/85%)
Vassar College (86%/91%)
Villanova University (87%/90%)
Wentworth Institute (49%/67%)
Western New England University (47%/55%)
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (76%/85%)


What an Attitude of Gratitude Can Do for You


With each November comes the holiday that marks the American tradition of Thanksgiving. It's a day devoted to festive feasts, road races, football rivalries, and family relatives. It's also a day set aside, in principle, for giving thanks.  And, given the current state of affairs in our world, it's especially important to take this time to reflect upon what we can appreciate in our lives.

Perhaps you can make this Thanksgiving the start of a new year in which giving thanks is exercised daily. No one needs to tell you that the American culture has come under attack in recent years for what at least some feel is an inflated sense of entitlement as we've witnessed the pursuit of happiness morphing into the expectation of such. It's to no one's surprise, then, that anger and angst often surface when this expectation goes unrealized. All of this can lead to a terribly toxic environment - not unlike one we may be in at the moment.  What may surprise you is that research is revealing a whole host of benefits that may be derived from regular expressions of appreciation and gratitude. Want proof? You may appreciate this article (The Neuroscience of Why Gratitude Makes Us Healthier) as evidence of the research, and this one as well (A Serving of Gratitude May Save the Day). It doesn't take a whole lot of effort, either. They can even be expressed in subtle ways.  Here's how.

Donate blood...Hold the door for someone...Give up your seat...Participate in a race/walk that benefits a charity...Send a note to someone who has shown you kindness...Stay calm during a stressful time...Let go of an old grudge...Mentor a classmate or colleague who is new to your school or organization...Throw a party for someone celebrating a milestone...Next time you're ready to blow the horn at a car - don't...Surprise someone...Say "thank you"...Write a letter to someone who's made a difference in your life...Tell your parents you love them...Tell your kids you love them...Give a compliment...Make a donation to your favorite charity, however small...Extend a warm welcome to a newcomer...Put yourself in another person's shoes...Reduce, reuse, recycle...Praise someone who's done well...Tell a joke...Kick bad habits that can harm others...Pass on good news...Give your full attention...Forgive yourself...Laugh...Call a friend you haven't heard from in awhile...Lead by example...Help a younger person discover a hidden talent...Invite someone who's not part of your inner circle to a friendly gathering...Teach about giving...When you see trash, pick it up...When you hear "trash", leave it be.

Practicing an attitude of gratitude - clearly a choice for most people - positively impacts human health, happiness, and social ties. Because so much of life is about giving and receiving, gratitude serves as the organic link between the two. Really - it's what makes us human.

So, make this Thanksgiving a truly Happy Meal, and launch the pursuit of happiness with a Happy New Year of Gratitude Expressed Daily. After awhile, you may find you don't need the research evidence to prove it works.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

11/01/2016


"My Career in Manufacturing Is a Reality"

Quinebaug Valley Community College (QVCC) has launched a new Advanced Manufacturing Program that opened the Advanced Manufacturing Center in August.  This skill is in high demand locally and paid internships are available at $12-$14 per hour, rising to $20 per hour after one year. Currently accepting only 50 students, enrollment fills quickly.  Registration is now open.
Advanced manufacturing provides opportunities for an innovative and creative career.  QVCC's program is nine months in duration, with 24 credits applied to an Associate Degree.  QVCC reports that 95% of their graduates in this program are employed, with many hired by manufacturing firms in the local area. 
An open house is scheduled on November 9th during which visitors may tour the new facility and gather information about the degree program.  For more information, click here.

Financial Aid Workshop for Parents 

 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17


Much has been published in recent months about the financial aid process related to college costs.  Included in all of this is the announcement of a major change that the federal government is introducing this year which is designed to provide more timely feedback to students and their parents/guardians.  The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) opened on October 1, three months earlier than in past years (January 1).  So parents/guardians will be able to use last year's (2015) tax returns when completing this form that is required by colleges and universities when families are seeking financial aid.

The EOSHS Guidance Department has scheduled a financial aid workshop at 7 pm on Thursday, NOVEMBER 17th in the school auditorium.  A representative from the Barnum Group, a financial organization that specializes in the financial aid process, will present information about the FAFSA, how the financial aid system can work for families, how colleges use tuition discounting as a tool in the admissions process, and how the CSS Profile differs from the FAFSA.  Additionally, time will be devoted for the representative to address questions from parents/guardians in attendance.

This workshop may be beneficial for parents/guardians of students in the lower grades (9, 10, 11) as well as for those who have seniors going through the college admissions process this year.

College Matriculation - Class of 2016

Below is a list of colleges (in alphabetical order) to which students from the Class of 2016 matriculated for this school year.  The number in parentheses indicated how many students enrolled in that school.  The percentages to the right reflect 4- and 6-year graduation rates.

Becker College (17%/28%)
Berklee College of Music ((45%/58%)
Boston College (2) (89%/92%)
Boston University (2) (80%/85%)
Bowdoin College (88%/93%)
Brandeis University (80%/86%)
Brown University (2) (83%/96%)
Central CT State University ((9) (25%/57%)
Clemson University (58%/81%)
Coastal Carolina University (26%/43%)
Dickinson College (81%/85%)
Duke University (2) (87%/95%)
East Carolina University (35%/62%)
Eastern CT State University (21) (44%/56%)
Emerson College (78%/80%)
Emmanuel College (56%/64%)
Florida Gulf University (22%/43%)
Full Sail University (43%/43%)
Goucher College (57%/69%)
Hofstra University (49%/60%)
Ithaca College (69%/76%)
James Madison University (66%/83%)
Johnson & Wales University (32%/41%)
Keene State College (2) (53%/63%)
Kent State University (32%/56%)
Maine College of Art (64%/67%)
Manchester Community College (19) (5%/18%)
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (34%/52%)
Middlebury College (87%/94%)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (82%/92%)
Moody Bible Institute (59%/69%)
Mount Ida College (2) (31%/40%)
Naugatuck Valley Community College (5%/14%)
Pace University (37%/53%)
Plymouth State University (44%/58%)
Queens University-Charlotte (46%/53%)
Quinebaug Valley Community College (6) (9%/16%)
Rhode Island College (14%/44%)
Rice University (80%/91%)
Rider University (54%/64%)
Renssalaer  Polytechnic Institute (63%/81%)
Sacred Heart University (58%/64%)
Saint Joseph's University (72%/79%)
Saint Leo University (31%/42%)
School of Visual Arts (3) (62%/69%)
Sierra Nevada College (27%/41%)
Southern CT State University (4) (23%/52%)
Springfield College (2) (63%/72%)
St. Lawrence University (82%/87%)
Suffolk University (41%/56%)
Three Rivers Community College (5%/15%)
Unity College (4) (46%/54%)
University of Connecticut (38) (70%83%)
University of Massachusetts (66%/78%)
University of California-Berkeley (73%/92%)
University of Hartford (49%/60%)
University of Kentucky (35%/61%)
University of Maine (2) (33%/55%)
University of New England (60%/65%)
University of New Hampshire (63%/80%)
University of New Haven (44%/54%)
University of Northwestern Ohio (29%/40%)
University of Pittsburgh (64%/82%)
University of Rhode Island (3) (44%/63%)
University of Southern Maine (13%/33%)
University of Vermont (2) (66%/77%)
University of Wisconsin (56%/85%)
Vassar College (86%/91%)
Villanova University (87%/90%)
Wentworth Institute (49%/67%)
Western New England University (47%/55%)
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (76%/85%)




Thursday, October 13, 2016

10/15/2016


LAST CALL FOR PSAT REGISTRATION
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14
SIGN UP IN THE EOS GUIDANCE OFFICE


PSAT Directions-October 19

Students registered for the PSAT (Wednesday, October 19) should report immediately to the assigned testing site at the beginning of school (7:20 AM).  The test location is below;
Back Gym     
Students should bring with them two #2 pencils and a calculator.  A short bathroom break will be scheduled during which students will also be allowed to eat snacks. 



Registration Deadline Approaching for MCC Courses


Below is a list of courses offered at EOSHS that are eligible for MCC credits. Note that these credits may transfer to other colleges and universities.  The registration process opened on September 19th and closes on October 19th.  The registration process opens again on January 9th for MCC courses that students will complete in the second semester.  This second registration period will close on February 5th.  In order to be eligible to earn college credits, students MUST complete the application.

Accounting 1A (MCC ACC 115)
Human Anatomy & Physiology A (MCC BIO 115)
Intro to Criminal Justice (MCC CJS 101)
Video Productions 1 & 2 (MCC COM 240)
English 12A (MCC ENGL 101)
Allied Health (MCC HLT 103)
Tech-Prep Culinary Arts (MCC HSP 101)
Statistics B (MCC MAT 109)
Algebra 3 and Trigonometry (MCC MAT 138)
Physics A (MCC PHY 110)
Foundations for College Success (MCC SD 111) - second semester


In order to be enrolled in the CCP Program, students must first complete an on-line application.  This application is available by clicking here.

Returning CCP students who have previously applied and enrolled in MCC courses in the past do NOT need to apply again.

Students should contact their counselors if they need more information.


Financial Aid Workshop for Parents 

CHANGED TO THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17


Much has been published in recent months about the financial aid process related to college costs.  Included in all of this is the announcement of a major change that the federal government is introducing this year which is designed to provide more timely feedback to students and their parents/guardians.  The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) opened on October 1, three months earlier than in past years (January 1).  So parents/guardians will be able to use last year's (2015) tax returns when completing this form that is required by colleges and universities when families are seeking financial aid.

The EOSHS Guidance Department has scheduled a financial aid workshop at 7 pm on Thursday, NOVEMBER 17th in the school auditorium.  A representative from the Barnum Group, a financial organization that specializes in the financial aid process, will present information about the FAFSA, how the financial aid system can work for families, how colleges use tuition discounting as a tool in the admissions process, and how the CSS Profile differs from the FAFSA.  Additionally, time will be devoted for the representative to address questions from parents/guardians in attendance.

This workshop may be beneficial for parents/guardians of students in the lower grades (9, 10, 11) as well as for those who have seniors going through the college admissions process this year.


College Goals Sunday


Program Providing Free Assistance for FAFSA


Sunday, October 23
Eastern CT State University

1:00-4:00 pm

Need help working your way through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?  It's available.  See below.


The Connecticut College Goal Sunday (CGS) program is an effort by hundreds of volunteers from across Connecticut who will come together with the common goal of making sure that the process of applying for college financial aid does not become an obstacle that would keep any person from pursuing an education beyond high school. By attending a College Goal Sunday event, participants will receive free, hands-on assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and they will walk away with the satisfaction of knowing they have accomplished one of the biggest steps in getting ready to go to college. Connecticut’s CGS will take place at a number of accessible sites throughout the state. In addition to receiving assistance in filling out the FAFSA, participants will receive general information regarding financial aid programs.  


Click on link  for more information and other dates/locations.  
NOTE THAT YOU SHOULD REGISTER IN ADVANCE.
Contact below for more information 
Neville Brown
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Eastern CGS Site Coordinator
Phone: 860-465-4428; e-mail: brownn@easternct.edu


Step-by-Step Video Tutorial on Completing the FAFSA


Click here for a video tutorial that will "walk" you through completion of the FAFSA.  This video was constructed for residents of Utah but applies to all US citizens because the FAFSA is a federal form.


Is an Elite College Worth the Sticker Price?  

Should Common Cents Prevail?


Given a choice between a most selective college (read: Ivy League and the like) and State U (like UConn), which do you choose?  Although the former can cost major bucks, the standard theory is that the lofty price of a prestigious diploma will reap huge dividends in future earnings.  But not everyone agrees.  In fact, some who have worked the numbers can prove otherwise. 
Alan Krueger is an economist and on the faculty at Princeton University, one of those most selective schools.  He, along with Stacy Dale, a researcher at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, challenged the long-standing theory more than a few years back when then they published their research findings designed to answer this question - Does attendance at and graduation from an elite college pay off in higher earnings for graduates?  They concluded that it doesn’t.  Here’s why.
Although they may give the appearance of doing so, in reality Krueger and Dale argued that the higher earnings accumulated by graduates of most selective schools are attributable to most selective individuals and not their college diplomas.  In other words, if you’re bright enough to gain admission to Harvard, you’re bright enough to earn lots of money, regardless of where you go to school (assuming that would be a major reason for attending a school like Harvard in the first place).
Still, there is lots of confusion surrounding this issue.  Several experts contend that Krueger and Dale are incorrect.  One such expert is Ronald Ehrenberg, Director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute, who claims that “on average, there is significant gain in going to a top private school”, both in terms of admission to better graduate schools and in higher lifetime earnings.  Harvard economist Caroline Hoxby contends that student aptitude accounts for about two-thirds to three-quarters of the earnings difference.  Yet, even allowing for this, her findings indicate that it pays to attend the most selective college available to you.  Her work factors in what students actually pay (with free financial aid) and not the list price of college tuition.
So whom do you believe and then what do you do ( assuming the option is available)?  Well, the experts suggest that you take all this data for what it’s worth, and then apply a healthy dose of common sense to what works for you and your family members.  Clearly, it’s worth it to weigh the costs, especially in light of the heavy weight of student debt that families are currently carrying and graduates’ inability to move on in their adult lives.The bottom line  should be net price  and not sticker price.


Federal Law Requires Colleges to Provide Real Cost of Education

A federal law was passed a couple of years ago that requires all college websites to provide an online tool called a net price calculator that is intended to give a more accurate estimate of real costs for students and families.  It's not meant to provide "sticker shock" but rather a more realistic - albeit, estimated - view of costs for attendance.

website managed by the federal government that's labeled College Navigator - National Center for Educational Statistics (available in "Helpful Links" below as well) already provides a good deal of this information.  Another link - Big Future/Paying for College - is another useful link.  Using these tools may reveal that some schools which appear to be out of reach may, in fact, be affordable if sufficient financial aid (based upon need) is provided.  At any rate, the time invested in using these tools may reap the net effect of finding affordable options for higher education.

Test Optional

Several more colleges and universities have chosen to become "test-optional" institutions in recent months, meaning that students are given the option of submitting their SAT/ACT scores. On the surface, it may appear that these schools are making the claim that other measures are far more important to consider than some standardized test taken on some Saturday morning (or a school day now). In fact, this may be the case since research indicates that students who choose not to submit scores perform just as well in the college classrooms as those students who do submit scores. Of course, there are cynics who believe that there are other strategic reasons for implementing the "test-optional" policy.  

Either way, schools that implement this option give students who feel their test scores would diminish their chances for admission the choice to hold back their scores. For those students who wish to have their scores considered, they go ahead and submit them.

To read one take on this, click on Rigors and Rewards for Going Test Optional.  Another resource on this issue of fair testing is available under Helpful Links - National Center for Fair and Open Testing.

UConn Part of New Coalition


Below is an announcement published on the website of a collection of over 80 colleges and universities that have formed a coalition designed to increase access to higher Education.  UConn is one of these schools.

An unprecedented coalition of diverse public and private colleges and universities has come together to improve the college admission application process for all students. The Coalition has developed a free platform of online tools to streamline the experience of applying to college. The initial iteration of the platform is now available to freshmen, sophomores and juniors in high school.

This new site has been introduced  - and not without controversy.

The link is under "Helpful Links".






Sunday, September 25, 2016

10/01/2016


GOOGLE IS CURRENTLY EXPERIENCING TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES WITH ITS BLOGGER GADGETS.  THUS, SEVERAL LINKS THAT WERE AVAILABLE ON THIS PAGE ARE NOW MISSING.  GOOGLE IS WORKING ON THE PROBLEM AND REPORTS THAT THE LINKS WILL SOON BE RESTORED.

LAST DAY TO SELECT ECE COURSES IN THE UCONN ECE 
DATABASE IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
CONTACT YOUR COUNSELOR IF YOU NEED MORE INFORMATION

A final announcement from the UConn Early College Experience (ECE) Office is below.

This is a final reminder that all students must enroll in their UConn ECE courses by this Friday, September 30, 2016.

To assist students, parents and schools, we are extending our business hours to 7:30 a.m.-7:00 p.m. until the deadline. If you have students needing help with either NetID activation or enrolling in their courses, please have them call our registration helpline at (855)382-8323.


Reminder About Registration for PSAT

Registration for the PSAT began last week and will continue until Friday, October 7.  The PSAT is a practice SAT that is highly recommended for juniors.  Sophomores  may wish to take it as well, but note that they should have already completed Geometry. The reason for the latter is that a portion of the math on the new PSAT includes Geometry and even some Trigonometry.  Sophomores should also note that they will have an opportunity to take the PSAT in March for free.

The test date is Wednesday, October 19th, and will be administered between 7:30-11:00 AM. The cost for the test is $15 and students may pay with cash or a check made out to EOSHS. Registration takes place in the Guidance Office. The window for test registration will remain open until Friday, October 7th. A late fee of $10 will be assessed after that date, provided room remains available for additional test-takers.

Juniors are eligible for National Merit Scholarships. Those students who score in the top half of the 99th percentile are typically selected as candidates for these scholarships. Their value has been $2500 and likely will remain so in the next year. Aside from eligibility for these scholarships, the new PSAT provides a testing experience that resembles the new SAT introduced this past March, and students who complete the PSAT receive in early December a detailed summary of their test performances. This summary may be very useful when preparing for the new SAT.  

Below are some brief facts about the new PSAT.

What does it measure?

Evidence-based reading and writing, reading, writing and language, and math.
Knowledge and skills developed through years of study in a wide range of courses are measured.
Continued emphasis upon reasoning along with a clearer focus on the knowledge, skills, and comprehension required for college and career success.
Greater emphasis on the meaning of words in extended contexts and how word choice influences meaning, tone, and impact.

What is the content?

Reading passages of various lengths that cover history/social studies as well as science, and students will be asked to analyze these passages .  
Multiple choice questions will focus upon command of evidence (how well students can translate and cite specific lines that support their interpretations), relevant words in context (how well students can select the best definition for how a word is used in a passage), expression of ideas (how well students can revise language in order to make more logical and cohesive arguments), and standard English conventions (assesses how well a student can conform to the basic rules of  English structure, punctuation, and usage.


How is it scored?

Scores are on a 20- to 80-point scale for critical reading, math, and writing skills.
Each correct answer equals 1 point.
Each omitted question equals no points.
There is no penalty for wrong answers (new this year).

Financial Aid Workshop for Parents Moved Up

CHANGED TO THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17


Much has been published in recent months about the financial aid process related to college costs.  Included in all of this is the announcement of a major change that the federal government is introducing this year which is designed to provide more timely feedback to students and their parents/guardians.  The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will open on October 1, three months earlier than in past years (January 1).  So parents/guardians will be able to use last year's (2015) tax returns when completing this form that is required by colleges and universities when families are seeking financial aid.

The EOSHS Guidance Department has scheduled a financial aid workshop at 7 pm on Wednesday, NOVEMBER 17TH in the school auditorium.  A representative from the Barnum Group, a financial organization that specializes in the financial aid process, will present information about the FAFSA, how the financial aid system can work for families, how colleges use tuition discounting as a tool in the admissions process, and how the CSS Profile differs from the FAFSA.  Additionally, time will be devoted for the representative to address questions from parents/guardians in attendance.

This workshop may be beneficial for parents/guardians of students in the lower grades (9, 10, 11) as well as for those who have seniors going through the college admissions process this year.


College Goals Sunday


Program Providing Free Assistance for FAFSA


Sunday, October 23
Eastern CT State University

1:00-4:00 pm

Need help working your way through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?  It's available.  See below.


The Connecticut College Goal Sunday (CGS) program is an effort by hundreds of volunteers from across Connecticut who will come together with the common goal of making sure that the process of applying for college financial aid does not become an obstacle that would keep any person from pursuing an education beyond high school. By attending a College Goal Sunday event, participants will receive free, hands-on assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and they will walk away with the satisfaction of knowing they have accomplished one of the biggest steps in getting ready to go to college. Connecticut’s CGS will take place at a number of accessible sites throughout the state. In addition to receiving assistance in filling out the FAFSA, participants will receive general information regarding financial aid programs.  


Click on link  for more information and other dates/locations.

Step-by-Step Video Tutorial on Completing the FAFSA


Click here for a video tutorial that will "walk" you through completion of the FAFSA.  This video was constructed for residents of Utah but applies to all US citizens because the FAFSA is a federal form.


Regional Tuition Discount Program 

Offers Affordable Options


Looking for a discount on college tuition? Well, the New England Board of Higher Education may have a program for you. Called the Regional Student Program (RSP) Tuition Break, this program is a partnership comprised of the public colleges and universities in New England that offers more than 700 undergraduate and graduate degree programs and provides a significant discount on regular out-of-state tuition rates to eligible students. 



Here's how it works - residents of one New England state are eligible when they attend certain public colleges in the other five New England states and pursue majors not offered by public colleges in their home state.  This means that a CT resident may enroll in an out-of-state public school in New England and pay what amounts to almost in-state tuition provided that the major pursued at the college is not one offered by any of the public colleges and universities in CT.


If interested, you can find more information about the program as well as majors available elsewhere at Regional Student Program Tuition Break.  

Below is a recent announcement made public by the RSP.

"As you advise students and families about their college and financial aid options, we encourage you to provide information on NEBHE's New England Regional Student Program (RSP), also known as Tuition Break.

The program will be relevant to students who find that their intended program of study is not offered by the University of Connecticut, Connecticut State University campuses or the Connecticut community colleges.

The RSP provides a tuition break to Connecticut residents, who are enrolled in approved degree programs at public colleges and universities in the five other New England states. 

In some cases, students may also be eligible under the Proximity Policy  option (available at certain colleges, when they live closer to an out-of-state college).

During the 2015-16 academic year, over 1,500 Connecticut residents were enrolled under the RSP and saved an estimated $10.3 million on their annual tuition bills. Students enrolled full time saved an average of $7,774.  For more details check out the Tuition Rates document."

Financial Aid: How It Works

Several individuals have been inquiring about financial aid and, more specifically, scholarships that are allegedly "out there" like untapped oil reserves. So, this entry will attempt to address the money issue related to the cost of higher education.

Let's start with a brief description of what financial aid looks like. This aid typically is "packaged" in a combination of three sources - grants (free money provided by the schools), loans (money for "rent", usually subsidized by the federal government and with low interest rates), and work-study opportunities (employment on campus). Combined, this "package" is supposed to meet the gap between what a family is expected to pay (called expected family contribution - "EFC") and the sticker price for attendance at a particular school. So, for instance, if school X costs $50,000 and your EFC is $25,000, then the financial aid package should amount to somewhere in the vicinity of the difference ($25,000). On the other hand, if School Y costs $25,000 (usually a public institution), then there may be no financial aid package provided - unless merit money is offered. Not all schools offer full coverage of the difference. In this case, families may tap into home equity or other sources (including personal bank loans) to close the gap. Grants, by the way, come in two forms - money based upon demonstrated need and money that is merit-based (earned by virtue of a student's academic achievement and/or SAT scores that meet established criteria set by the schools).

How is the EFC determined? Well, most every school requires families to submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This application is submitted to the government, now available on October 1 as noted above.  The information provided is based upon the previous year's tax records.  Some schools also require families to submit the CCS Profile available at The College Board web site (click here). Either or both form(s) is/are then sent to the schools to which one's child has applied and the Financial Aid Office at each school then calculates a financial aid package. It's not a precise science and, thus, aid packages may differ by school. It's not unusual for these aid packages to differ according to the degree to which each school would like the student to matriculate and/or the degree to which a school meets demonstrated need.  Use the Net Price Calculator listed under "Links to Financial Aid" on the left of this page to get an estimate of the costs to attend specific colleges.  These costs may differ based upon the formulas used by each school.

Local scholarships are available and these are generally announced sometime between March and June. The Guidance Department lists scholarship opportunities on the Naviance site. This may be accessed in the "Parent" portion of the EOS web site. As for those other scholarships "out there", FastWeb  is one web site that is reputable. There are several scams that fool too many people looking for "free" money. One such site is https://www.fafsa-application.com. DON'T USE IT. THE SITE YOU SHOULD USE IS here.  For more links, look to the left of this page under Financial Aid.

There may be "oil" to discover, but you may also need to do lots of drilling down into the data mine to unearth it.