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Friday, April 14, 2017

04/15/2017

Important Information About MCC Courses


Students enrolled in College Career Pathways (CCP) courses, otherwise known as Manchester Community College (MCC) courses at EOSHS, have the option of withdrawing from a CCP course if they wish to exclude the course from their MCC transcripts.  Students MUST complete a withdrawal form, available in the EOS Guidance Office, if they intend to withdraw from the course.  The deadline for withdrawal is April 21st.

Note that withdrawal from a CCP course at this time of year only means that the final grade in the course will not appear on an MCC transcript.  This does NOT mean withdrawal from the course at EOSHS.  Although the final grade will not appear on an MCC transcript, it will appear on an EOSHS transcript.

Students who withdraw from a CCP course after April 21st but before the last day of school will receive a "W" (withdrawal) on their MCC transcripts.

Students who do not withdraw by the last day of classes at EOSHS will receive the grades assigned to them and these grades will appear on their MCC transcripts.  Transcripts are permanent records and cannot be altered.  MCC reports that a grade of "W" on a college transcript may negatively impact eligibility for financial aid.


Timeline for Registering in Courses on UConn Campus


Students interested in registering for courses on the UConn Campus for the fall semester should wait until early May to contact Doug Melody. The 2017-18 master schedule for EOSHS should be constructed by then, so it will be easier to match courses on campus to courses offered at EOS.

Eligible students (11th and 12th grade students with academic credentials - strong transcript and combined SAT scores of 1200+ in Evidence-Based Reading & Writing and Math) may request enrollment in no more than two classes per semester. Decisions on enrollment are made by the Early College Experience Office. EOS students enroll as part-timers. Typically, about 30 students enroll in courses there each semester. 

Final grades earned in courses on campus appear on both EOS transcripts and UConn transcripts. It should be noted that the grades earned in courses taken on campus are NOT factored into the EOS cumulative GPA. 

AP Exam Schedule and Procedures


For those students planning to take AP exams, they are reminded that the balance for each exam is $73 and is payable on the day of the exam.  Click here to access the AP exam schedule.

College Board allows you to bring up to two approved calculators with the necessary capabilities if you are taking the AP Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, or Statistics Exams. Click here to find the calculator policy for each subject. AP Biology students may not use a scientific or graphing calculator.  They must use a four-function calculator. If students choose not to use a calculator for one of these exams, they will need to sign a Calculator Release Statement that provides assurance to The College Board that they will not use the absence of a calculator to challenge their score on the exam. AP Physics 1 students should bring a straight-edge/ruler in addition to a calculator.


Other reminders:


  • Bring #2 pencils (NOT mechanical pencils - The College Board does not provide assurance that a mechanical pencil will scan properly) and pens with black or dark blue ink. 
  • Students should report to the Guidance Office 40 minutes before the scheduled time for exams.
  • No cell phones or other electronic devices may be brought into the exam room, nor may students check these devices during the 10-minute break between sections of the exam.  The College Board reserves the right to cancel a student’s score for this type of violation.
  • Students may not bring food and drink into the exam room, though they may bring refreshments for during breaks.
  • There is NO ¼-point penalty for wrong answers on AP Exams.
  • The name and email on your registration answer sheet should match the name and email on your College Board account. 

UConn Early College Experience Goes Online


 The window for registration in ECE courses for 2017-18 will open on April 24.  Students will need to closely follow instructions in order to become eligible for college credits.

For the 2017-2018 school yearstudents will be responsible for applying and registering for their approved courses online; either at home or at school. 

To assist in the transition, ECE customer support hours will be extended during the registration cycle to help those who need assistance. 

Below is a checklist that students should follow as they complete the registration process;

Select Your Courses
  • Meet with your counselor to choose your ECE courses for 2017-18
  • Obtain all required consent to enroll in courses, including counselor and parent/guardian signatures.
  • Review your completed and signed Consent Form, including double-checking the course information with your counselor.
  • Make a copy of the form for your records.

    Apply to the UConn Early College Experience Program Online

Deadline to apply is June 1, 2017


  • Go to this link and review the online tutorial.  Once ready, hit "Apply Now".
  • Create your user ID and password and save in a secure location.
  • Complete the online application.
  • Upload your signed consent form with your application.  If you are unable to upload the form (you may scan it or take a picture of it before uploading it), contact the helpline at 1.855.382.8323.  Help is available from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm Monday-Friday.
  • Monitor your email daily for a message from UConn confirming your application has been processed and you are ready to enroll.  You will be unable to enroll in your course(s) until your application is processed.  Please allow at least two weeks for your application to be processed during peak periods.  Apply early for quicker processing.

Enroll in Your Courses Online

Deadline to enroll in courses is June 30, 2017

  • Once your enrollment notification is received, follow the link to enroll in your course(s).
  • Select your high school and the approved course(s) listed on your consent form.  Follow the directions until submission is complete.

Contact the ECE helpline at 1.855.382.8323 if you need assistance.

ECE courses offered at EOSHS are listed below; 

AD Biology (UC BIOL 1107)
AD Biology (UC BIOL 1108)
AD English (UC ENGL 1010)
AD Latin 4 (UC CAMS 3102)
AD Latin 5 (UC CAMS 3102)
AD Principles of Microeconomics (UC ECON 1201)

AD Principles of Macroeconomics (UC ECON 1202)
AD French 5 (UC FREN 3250 and 3268)
AD World Civilizations (UC HIST 1300)
AD Modern European History (UC HIST 1400)
AD US History (UC HIST 1501 and 1502)
AD Biotechnology (PLSC 3230) 
AD Human Development & Family Studies (UC HDFS 1070) New
AD Latin America Studies (UC LAMS 1190)
Discrete Math (UC MATH 1030Q)
AD Calculus (UC MATH 1131Q and 1132Q)
AD Physics (UC PHYS 1201Q and 1202Q)
AD Physics with Calculus (UC PHYS 1401 and 1402) New
AD German 5 (UC GERM 3233 and 3255)
AD Spanish 5 (UC SPAN 3178 and 3179)

AP Statistics (UC STAT 1100Q)

Saturday, April 1, 2017

04/01/2017

SAT Opportunity Offered on Wednesday, April 5

As announced previously in a variety of ways, the Connecticut State Board of Education and Governor Dan Malloy are allowing high schools to choose the SAT as an alternative option to the SBAC.  Like many high schools throughout the state, EOSHS has chosen the SAT option as the measure that will be used to assess current 11th graders with regard to college and career readiness.  This assessment opportunity will be offered on Wednesday, April 5th.

There will be three test sites for 11th graders - the back gym, the lecture hall, and the LMC.   Note that students have been assigned by alphabetical order to one of the three test sites.  Last names beginning with A-Loh should report to the back gym, Lom-Sha to the lecture hall, and She-Z to the LMC.

There are reasons to take the SAT even if students are uncertain about their postsecondary plans. Below are just a few:
  • Although community colleges are "open admissions schools" - meaning that virtually all students with a high school diploma are admitted - students still need to demonstrate readiness to succeed in college-level courses.  Thus, students are required to complete placement tests (called Accuplacer) and must achieve established benchmark scores in order to enroll in courses that will earn them college credits towards a degree.  Students who do not achieve the aforementioned benchmarks are scheduled into remedial courses.  Successful completion of these courses will then allow these students to enroll in college courses.  Understand this - these remedial courses cost both time and money.  Students can avoid the placement tests by earning a minimum score of 550 on the SAT Math portion and a 450 on the Evidence-Based Reading & Writing segment of the SAT.
  • More and more colleges and universities are becoming "test optional" schools, meaning that students applying to these schools are not required to submit SAT (or ACT) scores as a condition for acceptance.  Still, students (and parents/guardians) should know that, in most instances, these same schools will require SAT scores if students wish to secure merit scholarships and/or admission to special programs(i.e., honors programs).
  • Several certificate and licensing programs will use SAT scores in lieu of other required assessments for admission.
  • Students may "bank" their scores and use them at a later date when their plans become more crystallized.
There is much debate about the predictive validity of test scores on assessments like the SAT as they relate to success in higher education.  The College Board has made known its research on college and career readiness indicators.  Essentially, earning "average" scores on each subtest (Math and Evidence-Based Reading & Writing) translate into college readiness.  An " average" score is 500, and to earn this score requires students to correctly answer about half of the test questions.

Beyond a combined score of 1000, any discussion about increasingly higher test scores correlated with success in higher education - never mind success in the "real" world - becomes even more complex (and heated).

It makes sense for 11th grade students to take advantage of the opportunity available to them on Wednesday.

For more information about the newly re-designed SAT and what you need to know, click here.

EOS Offers Free PSAT to Sophomores

EOSHS will offer an opportunity for all sophomores to take the PSAT on Wednesday, April 5th and it will be free to students.  The test will be administered in the morning, beginning at 7:25 am and concluding at 11:45 am.

The primary purposes for administering this assessment in April are for students to gain both exposure to and experience with the test format and content.  With student feedback on performance coming in the form of detailed score reports, students will have valuable information in hand that will help them to identify strengths and weaknesses relative to the content and skills measured on the assessment.  And this will provide ample time for them to strengthen identified areas of weakness in preparation for the SAT that they will be encouraged to take in April of their junior year.

So, in effect, the PSAT on April 5th will serve as a "dress rehearsal" or "scrimmage game" that will provide feedback on where they are at that point in time relative to college and career readiness.

Room assignments will be posted next week.  For more information about this, students and parents/guardians are encouraged to contact their counselors.

National College Fair Dates

The National College Fair, a program offered by the National Association for College Admissions Counselors, is "on tour" and will be in Hartford on April 6/7, Springfield on April 3, and Providence on May 8 .  Several colleges from around the country will be represented at booths.  In addition, workshops will be offered on such topics as the admissions process and financial aid.  Students may register by clicking here.

MCC Offers Spring Open House


Manchester Community College (MCC) is offering prospective students an opportunity to attend an "Open House" from 4 pm to 6:30 pm on Tuesday, April 4.  Workshops will be held in Great Path Academy (part of MCC) on a variety of topics - including the admissions process, paying for college, and credit transfer.  

For more information, click here.  


Important Information About MCC Courses


Students enrolled in College Career Pathways (CCP) courses, otherwise known as Manchester Community College (MCC) courses at EOSHS, have the option of withdrawing from a CCP course if they wish to exclude the course from their MCC transcripts.  Students MUST complete a withdrawal form, available in the EOS Guidance Office, if they intend to withdraw from the course.  The deadline for withdrawal is April 21st.

Note that withdrawal from a CCP course at this time of year only means that the final grade in the course will not appear on an MCC transcript.  This does NOT mean withdrawal from the course at EOSHS.  Although the final grade will not appear on an MCC transcript, it will appear on an EOSHS transcript.

Students who withdraw from a CCP course after April 21st but before the last day of school will receive a "W" (withdrawal) on their MCC transcripts.

Students who do not withdraw by the last day of classes at EOSHS will receive the grades assigned to them and these grades will appear on their MCC transcripts.  Transcripts are permanent records and cannot be altered.  MCC reports that a grade of "W" on a college transcript may negatively impact eligibility for financial aid.


Military Service Academy Night


Students interested in learning about our nation's military academies (Air Force Academy, Coast Guard Academy, Naval Academy,  West Point Academy) may do so by attending the 2017 Military Service Academy Night on Wednesday, April 26 at 6 pm in the MG Maurice Rose Armed Forces Reserve Center on 375 Smith Street in Middletown, CT.  The CT Congressional Delegation is arranging this evening.

For more information about this evening, find contact information below.

Kathy Bass
Office of Senator Christopher Murphy
Colt Gateway Building
120 Huyshope Avenue, Suite 401
Hartford, CT 06106

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

03/15/2017

MCC Offers Spring Open House


Manchester Community College (MCC) is offering prospective students an opportunity to attend an "Open House" from 4 pm to 6:30 pm on Tuesday, April 4.  Workshops will be held in Great Path Academy (part of MCC) on a variety of topics - including the admissions process, paying for college, and credit transfer.  

For more information, click here.  


Registration for AP Exams Begins Continues Until March 24

Students interested in taking AP exams must register for them in the Guidance Office.  Registration began on Monday, March 6th and concludes on Friday, March 24th. Scheduled during the first two weeks of May, these three-hour exams are offered in a variety of subject areas.  The registration fee is $20 (cash or checks made payable to EO Smith) per exam, with the balance of $73 paid (total cost for each exam is $93) on the day of each exam.  For more information go to AP Central.

National College Fair Dates

The National College Fair, a program offered by the National Association for College Admissions Counselors, is "on tour" and will be in Hartford on April 6/7, Springfield on April 3, and Providence on May 8 .  Several colleges from around the country will be represented at booths.  In addition, workshops will be offered on such topics as the admissions process and financial aid.  Students may register by clicking here.

Register for Free SAT Prep Through Khan Academy


The College Board has partnered with Khan Academy to provide free SAT support in preparation to take the SAT.  Click here to set up your own personalized program.

CT Dollars and Sense


A new website was launched on Feb. 16 called CT Dollars and Sense – a web portal for Connecticut students and parents to find out how to plan, save and pay for college.   Click here or on the aforementioned title for more information.
The site provides information from five State agencies supporting students and their families: the Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET), the Connecticut Higher Education Supplemental Loan Authority (CHESLA), the Office of Higher Education, the Department of Banking, and the Department of Consumer Protection. There is also a Financial Literacy platform on the site that covers Paying for School, Managing Money, and Finding a Career.
Try it.

UConn Pre-College Summer: 

A Campus Experience for Talented Teens


Get a glimpse of college life this summer and immerse yourself in a research or creative project  with peers with similar interests at 2017 UCONN Pre-College Summer. July 9 – August 5 (four one-week sessions).  If you are a current 10th or 11th grade student, continue reading.

Experience college life in a supportive setting.  Attend presentations about the Honors Program, Undergraduate Admissions, First Year Experience, and career planning and meet representatives from the many cultural centers and communities on campus.   Join an evening activity and have fun getting to know the students and residential staff.

For more information click here or call 860.486.0149.

ECE Offers Scholarship Opportunity

The Office of Early College Programs (OECP) has announced that applications for new student scholarships are now being accepted. These scholarships will be awarded to exemplary UConn ECE students in three separate areas of excellence, with a total of five awards given each year. Scholarships will be for: 
  • Excellence in the Arts, Humanities or Social Sciences (2 awards) 
  • Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (2 awards) 
  • Civic and Community Engagement (1 award) 
Students selected for these awards will receive a certificate of accomplishment along with a $500 monetary award to use towards post-secondary education expenses. 
Applications will be accepted until March 30, 2017. Applicants will be notified of the outcome in early May. Recipients of these scholarships will be presented their check and award certificate at their high school between May 15th- June 15th. 
Please take a moment to view the new webpage with all of the details by clicking here. Contact the OECP for more information.

Is Average Good Enough Now?


Let's say that someone asks you to compare yourself to the average person.  You know - the Average Joe, Plain Jane type.  If you're like most people, you'll probably rate yourself above average.  So, being like most people, this then actually makes you quite normal.  But think about it - if people on average consider themselves to be above average, then what's this say about average?  Is it now normal to be above average?  Or are we deluding ourselves by thinking this?

What is "average", anyway?  Well, in statistical speak, you probably recall from a math class in your past that average is a measure of central tendency that may be expressed in several ways - like mean, median, and mode.  It's basic arithmetic - or at least it should be.  The one most commonly referred to is the arithmetic mean that's calculated by adding the sum total of a group of whatever and dividing it by that number of whatever.  Of course, the flaw with this kind of average is that it may be skewed by what's called outliers.  For example, let's say Average Joe makes $25000, Plain Jane earns $22000, and Tom, Dick, and Harry each makes $31000.  Meanwhile, their boss, Jay Gatsby, is pocketing a tidy sum of $1,200,000.  You do the math.  The average (mean) individual salary earned in this group is $233,333.33. But what's this tell you.  Not much, except maybe that Jay looks like your average CEO and Jane's wages may be deflated because she stayed home to raise her children during those first few years.  

Besides, it's typically not the average we even consider when we're referring to what's normal.  Rarely is one THE average, anyway (although we often assume we know).  Think about it - who has 2.06 kids (the average number of children per family in the US)?  Solving for the average "x" poses a challenge in several ways.  What's the average family?  It's NOT a nuclear family comprised of a married couple with two (and .06) children living in suburban sprawl.  Not even close.  As for education, it's hardly the case that the typical college student resides on a bucolic campus, moves methodically through a course of studies and graduates in four years.  More accurately, the "non-traditional student" has become the new normal as only 41% of college students actually earn degrees in the "average" time frame of four years.  This number rises to 59% when extending to six years. 

Nevertheless, averages are used all the time.   We humans can't help but make social comparisons.  Nothing seems to matter unless it's in the context of a norm.  We do this with our kids just soon after they exit the delivery room and first weigh in and are measured for length ("Percentile, please?").  It escalates when they enter grade school and boils over with that first purchase of the US News & World Report edition of "Best Colleges". We crave rankings of every kind even when we know they aren't necessarily accurate (but they're "numbers"!)...or always good for us, either.  Still, norms and rankings lend a perspective by providing a location for us on that distribution spread known as the bell curve.  And, of course, we need to be at least somewhere in the middle of that curve - preferably near the high end.

But what if averages don't even matter anymore?  What if Average Is Over (click on it to read), a piece written by Tom Friedman appearing in the NY Times, and that Tyler Cowen actually slapped on the cover for the title of his book?  In each case, the aforementioned writers argue that average has indeed expired.  For Friedman, he claims that there is no longer a place for vanilla-flavored talent in this expanded global economy while Cowen pours vinegar all over the sacrosanct middle-class.  It sure seems like being "normal" these days puts one, oddly enough, in the depths of that bell curve rather than near its peak. Being middle-of-the-road, it seems, no longer earns you membership in the middle-class.  Even worse, if you buy this story by Cowen, the middle-class is slowly becoming a recollection of the glory days gone by.

So, even if we can't arrive at what being average means today, it's becoming more apparent that we need to be better than average if we want to achieve success and make a living that will deliver a meaningful life and engaging employment - the kind once enjoyed by the now dissolving middle-class.  It now seems like we have in one corner Average Joe, Plain Jane, and Tom, Dick and Harry and in the other corner we have people like Jay Gatsby.  And then there is the Great Divide that once housed the middle-of-the-road populace that is now the U-shaped Valley of the Ashes.  We are, according to Friedman and Cowen, becoming a land of outliers.

What's this mean?  It means that if we rate ourselves above average, we better be able to back it up.  We better be able to stand apart and distinguish ourselves in ways that are recognizable and valued and can be validated.  And we need to continue to do this throughout our lives.  Even if we can't define normal/average, we probably can tell what it looks like.  Average these days simply means eh-verage.  If all one can say about you or me is "eh", then we may need to think about for whom the bell curve tolls.

For more information about what all of this may mean in the future, you may want to click on any or all of the articles listed below.







  

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

03/01/2017

Registration for AP Exams Begins on Monday, March 6

Students interested in taking AP exams must register for them in the Guidance Office.  Registration begins on Monday, March 6th and concludes on Friday, March 24th. Scheduled during the first two weeks of May, these three-hour exams are offered in a variety of subject areas.  The registration fee is $20 (cash or checks made payable to EO Smith) per exam, with the balance of $73 paid (total cost for each exam is $93) on the day of each exam.  For more information go to AP Central.

National College Fair Dates

The National College Fair, a program offered by the National Association for College Admissions Counselors, is "on tour" and will be in Hartford on April 6/7, Springfield on April 3, and Providence on May 8 .  Several colleges from around the country will be represented at booths.  In addition, workshops will be offered on such topics as the admissions process and financial aid.  Students may register by clicking here.

Register for Free SAT Prep Through Khan Academy


The College Board has partnered with Khan Academy to provide free SAT support in preparation to take the SAT.  Click here to set up your own personalized program.

CT Dollars and Sense


A new website was launched on Feb. 16 called CT Dollars and Sense – a web portal for Connecticut students and parents to find out how to plan, save and pay for college.   Click here or on the aforementioned title for more information.
The site provides information from five State agencies supporting students and their families: the Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET), the Connecticut Higher Education Supplemental Loan Authority (CHESLA), the Office of Higher Education, the Department of Banking, and the Department of Consumer Protection. There is also a Financial Literacy platform on the site that covers Paying for School, Managing Money, and Finding a Career.
Try it.

UConn Pre-College Summer: 

A Campus Experience for Talented Teens


Get a glimpse of college life this summer and immerse yourself in a research or creative project  with peers with similar interests at 2017 UCONN Pre-College Summer. July 9 – August 5 (four one-week sessions).  If you are a current 10th or 11th grade student, continue reading.. 

 UCONN Mentor Connection is unique because it will provide students with the opportunity for hands-on participation in research and creative projects under the supervision of university mentors.  Students will learn more about their area of interests and could very well be on the path to deciding their college major.

Experience college life in a supportive setting.  Attend presentations about the Honors Program, Undergraduate Admissions, First Year Experience, and career planning and meet representatives from the many cultural centers and communities on campus.   Join an evening activity and have fun getting to know the students and residential staff.

For more information click here or call 860.486.0149.

ECE Offers Scholarship Opportunity

The Office of Early College Programs (OECP) has announced that applications for new student scholarships are now being accepted. These scholarships will be awarded to exemplary UConn ECE students in three separate areas of excellence, with a total of five awards given each year. Scholarships will be for: 
  • Excellence in the Arts, Humanities or Social Sciences (2 awards) 
  • Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (2 awards) 
  • Civic and Community Engagement (1 award) 
Students selected for these awards will receive a certificate of accomplishment along with a $500 monetary award to use towards post-secondary education expenses. 
Applications will be accepted from February 15, 2017- March 30, 2017. Applicants will be notified of the outcome in early May. Recipients of these scholarships will be presented their check and award certificate at their high school between May 15th- June 15th. 
Please take a moment to view the new webpage with all of the details by clicking here. Contact the OECP for more information.

QVCC Offers Scholarships

The QVCC Foundation is awarding $135000 in scholarships to students attend school there.  The application deadline is Friday, March 10.  For more information about this scholarship opportunity, click on this link - QVCC Scholarships. 






Wednesday, February 15, 2017

02/15/17


Follow EOS Guidance Twitter

If you haven't already done so and you're a Twitter user, take a moment to add @eos_guidance to your account.  Get up-to-date announcements, links, and the like on a regular basis.  Check out the link in the upper left corner and add it to your list.

Check Out the Message Board

Be sure to check out the Message Board (link is in upper right corner of this page) for updates on information about a variety of topics, including scholarship opportunities.  This board is the same one on display in the EOS main foyer and Guidance Department Office.

Registration for AP Exams Begins on Monday, March 6

Students interested in taking AP exams must register for them in the Guidance Office.  Registration begins on Monday, March 6th and concludes on Friday, March 24th. Scheduled during the first two weeks of May, these three-hour exams are offered in a variety of subject areas.  The registration fee is $20 (cash or checks made payable to EO Smith) per exam, with the balance of $73 paid (total cost for each exam is $93) on the day of each exam.  For more information go to AP Central.

Tuition Discounts for Connecticut Residents

Looking for a discount on college tuition? Well, the New England Board of Higher Education may have a program for you. Called the Regional Student Program (RSP) Tuition Break, this program is a partnership comprised of the public colleges and universities in New England that offers more than 700 undergraduate and graduate degree programs and provides a significant discount on regular out-of-state tuition rates to eligible students. 

Here's how it works - residents of one New England state are eligible when they attend certain public colleges in the other five New England states and pursue majors not offered by public colleges in their home state.  This means that a CT resident may enroll in an out-of-state public school in New England and pay what amounts to almost in-state tuition provided that the major pursued at the college is not one offered by any of the public colleges and universities in CT.

If interested (and why wouldn't you be?), you can find more information about the program as well as majors available elsewhere at Regional Student Program Tuition Break. You can also read testimonials from graduates of the RSP by clicking here.  

Click here for fast facts about the the college landscape in New England and here for information about how many students typically transfer and where.  Click here for program's annual report (2016-17).

Updates on NCAA Clearinghouse Eligibility

Students who enroll full time at an NCAA Division I school this fall must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  • Complete 16 core courses:
  • Four years of English
  • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it)
  • One additional year of English, math or natural/physical science
  • Two years of social science
  • Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy 
  • Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of the seventh semester. Once students begin their seventh semester, they must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used in the preliminary academic certification.
  •  Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in their core courses. 
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching their core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale, which balances their test score and core-course GPA. If students have a low test score, they will need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If they have a low core-course GPA, they will need a higher test score to be eligible.  
For more information, click on the NCAA Eligibility Center link and NCAA Student Guide listed on the left side of this page.


Joint Yale/FBI Program

The New Haven Field Office of the FBI and Yale University Police Department are proud to announce the second annual Future Law Enforcement Youth Academy (FLEYA). Two of America’s most notable and iconic institutions have partnered to create a week-long law enforcement and legal training camp for Connecticut teenagers June 18 – June 24, 2017.
Applications are currently being accepted for the 2017 Future Law Enforcement Youth Academy (FLEYA). The deadline to apply is March 10, 2017.
The Future Law Enforcement Youth Academy (FLEYA) will give participants an inside look at today’s FBI and exposure to various local, state and federal law enforcement agencies and practices.
Participants will receive specific classroom training and practical exercises in investigative forensics, cyber technology techniques for combating violent crime, counterintelligence, gang awareness, and civil rights. Assistant US Attorneys and State Attorneys, local police, judges, and federal agents will lead trainings and classes.
FLEYA participants will be housed on the Yale campus, chaperoned by law enforcement and FBI employees, including Yale PD officers and FBI National Academy Alumni. Each participant will be matched with an alumni officer from his/her county to promote ongoing connections and networking.
All applicants must:
  • Be between 15–18 years of age and returning to a Connecticut high school in 2017 
  • Be full-time Connecticut resident 
  • Be committed to physical fitness through sports or other activity 
  • Have a minimum GPA of 2.7 
  • Submit a completed online application which includes a 200 word essay 
  • Participate in an initial telephone interview if selected by staff members of the academy 
  • Participate in a final panel interview at FBI New Haven 
Student applications and instructions for FLEYA can be found at here.
Twenty-Eight (28) students from urban, rural, and suburban CT high schools will be selected to participate. The program seeks students from diverse racial, and cultural backgrounds. This program will promote tolerance, unity, and the importance of partnerships for success in the working world.
The application deadline is March 10, 2017.
Community Outreach Specialist (COS) Charles Grady
Charles.Grady@ic.fbi.gov
203 503 5207
Training/Civic Liaison Specialist JoAnn Benson
JoAnn.Benson2@ic.fbi.gov
203 503 5270


Hidden Figures In the Arts and Sciences


Perhaps you've seen the movie "Hidden Figures" that has played in theaters recently (click here for the trailer).  Thought-provoking, for sure, it's a story that reveals a whole host of socio-cultural issues that were present in the sixties, with several remaining still today. One such issue is our fascination with numbers and the power they seem to possess.  The storyline in the movie addresses the meaning often hidden in the figures.  It's a message that could very easily be applied to the fascination we hold with test scores today.  

An article published in the New York Times a couple of years ago titled "Creativity vs. Quants" (click here for it) shines a light on the aforementioned fascination.  It's especially relevant as we learn more about how artificial intelligence and automation threaten to take over several occupations currently served by human beings.  It's also why the Rhode Island School of Design added the A in STE(A)M.  The writer pays homage to chaotic thinking as a necessary precursor to the creative process, a process that remains uniquely human.  There is also mention made of the critical stage of incubation that precedes the "aha" moment, that period when inspiration is in the prenatal stage and takes form out of sight before an idea is born.  It's this element, especially in the mix of teaching and learning, that requires attention if today's students will become productive employees/citizens as adults in the years to come.  Tests, no doubt, measure some things.  And other things count that simply can't be measured.  

I recently watched a full orchestra perform that was comprised of students in a conservatory.  These students are also required to major in another field outside of music for reasons I'll avoid mentioning now for the sake of brevity.  What is worth mentioning is that the orchestra conductor also happened to be the president of this college.  I wondered, as I watched him lead the sections through musical scores, if he viewed his faculty and staff as an orchestra in a similar way to how he viewed the musicians he was leading that night.  If he did, I wondered how he would arrange the sectionals by discipline - and why.  Where and why would he arrange content areas in such a way as to blend the separate disciplines - the arts and the sciences -  into a complementary whole.

It's the creative tension (harmony) played by the sectionals that creates a full sound.  And the whole, if performed properly, becomes greater than the sum of its parts.  Likewise, it's the creative tension celebrated by any group (why not include the New England Patriots here as a current example) that, collectively, makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts.  It's when 1+1=3.  And this is why it's hard to quantify.

Standardized assessments (both formative and summative) have their place as measurements for growth in learning.  Valid and reliable tests that measure what they're designed to measure can be valid and reliable tools in the process.  That said, it's also necessary to look beyond the numbers in a similar way that we sometimes need to read between the lines.  This takes courage... and sometimes requires chaos.


So, the piece is worth a few minutes of your time (and the movie is worth several more).  It really shouldn't be about quants vs. creativity.  And discussions about change shouldn't be about this ( for example, standardized assessments) or that (for example, class grades).  It shouldn't be about the sciences or the arts, either.  Rather, discussions should be about this AND that.  It's this kind of mindset, one that is comfortable with chaos and ambiguity, that can lead to substantive change.  It's this duality that can't really be separated (think about the term "indivi-dual") that needs to be recognized.  And it's about a collective will to embrace it if we are to retain the human-ities in our schools.