A Reminder About Helpful Links

Be sure to check out the helpful links posted on both sides of the page!
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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

11/15/2017

PSAT Score Reports Due for Return in December

Over 150 students sat for the PSAT in October. This test is a shortened version of the new SAT. It does not include the essay that is now optional on the new SAT. The PSAT can be a relatively accurate predictor of performance on the SAT. 

It can also serve as a valuable learning tool in preparation for the SAT. Aside from "experiencing" the test in a formal setting (albeit not the three-plus hour version), test-takers receive a detailed itemized analysis of their test results. The EOS Guidance Department collects the test booklets with student names on them and then mails each student's test booklet home along with the score report. So students have the opportunity to review each question, observe which ones they answered correctly, and which ones they answered incorrectly. Furthermore, with each question tagged by a specific content area label, students can also identify areas that may need further attention when preparing for the SAT.

If used properly, the score report can be a very valuable learning tool. For those who took the test, they should expect to receive this information by mail in early December.

Attend a FAFSA Day Session at MCC


MCC is offering a FAFSA Day session that is designed to provide free, hands-on assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).  MCC Financial Aid and Enrollment Services Staff will be available to provide assistance with the FAFSA.  The date and time set for this free service is November 28 from 4:30-6:30 PM.

The 2018-19 FAFSA is completed with 2016 financial information.  All information reviewed by the MCC staff will be kept private and confidential.

For more information, click here.  

Careers in the Middle

MCC recently offered a program on its campus called "Careers in the Middle" and its purpose was to present information about promising careers that require less than a four-year degree.  Careers in healthcare and manufacturing were featured as these two areas appear to offer the most potential for employment opportunities in the decade ahead.  Other useful links mentioned during the conference are listed below.

Connecticut State Colleges and Universities

Still other opportunities were promoted in a recent presentation on the aerospace industry.  Employment opportunities are available for those who may wish to seek certification degrees that will prepare individuals to take advantage of these opportunities.  Click here to read a story recently appearing in the Hartford Courant.

Careers that don't require a four-year degree are readily available for students who are prepared to enter these fields.  Community colleges in CT have established programs to prepare students for such opportunities.  

A Reminder About Rolling Admissions at CT Public Universities

The CT public universities - CCSU, ECSU, SCSU, WCSU - offer admission on a rolling basis, meaning that these schools accept qualified students throughout the year. It means NOW. Students (and parents/guardians) should know that these schools have become more attractive in recent years for several reasons - not the least of which is the "price tag".  

A few years ago, SCSU closed its "doors" to applicants in March of the application cycle. This was much earlier than ever before. So, it becomes increasingly more difficult to be admitted as one waits longer to submit applications to these schools. 

Act now if the intention is there to apply to any (or all) of these schools.  There is no reason to wait. 


What an Attitude of Gratitude Can Do for You

With each November comes the holiday that marks the American tradition of Thanksgiving. It's a day devoted to festive feasts, road races, football rivalries, and family relatives. It's also a day set aside, in principle, for giving thanks.  And, given the current state of affairs in our world, it's especially important to take this time to reflect upon what we can appreciate in our lives.

Perhaps you can make this Thanksgiving the start of a new year in which giving thanks is exercised daily. No one needs to tell you that the American culture has come under attack in recent years for what at least some feel is an inflated sense of entitlement as we've witnessed the pursuit of happiness morphing into the expectation of such. It's to no one's surprise, then, that anger and angst often surface when this expectation goes unrealized. All of this can lead to a terribly toxic environment - not unlike one we may be in at the moment.  What may surprise you is that research is revealing a whole host of benefits that may be derived from regular expressions of appreciation and gratitude. Want proof? You may appreciate this article (The Neuroscience of Why Gratitude Makes Us Healthier) as evidence of the research, and this one as well (A Serving of Gratitude May Save the Day). It doesn't take a whole lot of effort, either. They can even be expressed in subtle ways.  Here's how.


Donate blood...Hold the door for someone...Give up your seat...Participate in a race/walk that benefits a charity...Send a note to someone who has shown you kindness...Stay calm during a stressful time...Let go of an old grudge...Mentor a classmate or colleague who is new to your school or organization...Throw a party for someone celebrating a milestone...Next time you're ready to blow the horn at a car - don't...Surprise someone...Say "thank you"...Write a letter to someone who's made a difference in your life...Tell your parents you love them...Tell your kids you love them...Give a compliment...Make a donation to your favorite charity, however small...Extend a warm welcome to a newcomer...Put yourself in another person's shoes...Reduce, reuse, recycle...Praise someone who's done well...Tell a joke...Kick bad habits that can harm others...Pass on good news...Give your full attention...Forgive yourself...Laugh...Call a friend you haven't heard from in awhile...Lead by example...Help a younger person discover a hidden talent...Invite someone who's not part of your inner circle to a friendly gathering...Teach about giving...When you see trash, pick it up...When you hear "trash", leave it be.



Practicing an attitude of gratitude - clearly a choice for most people - positively impacts human health, happiness, and social ties. Because so much of life is about giving and receiving, gratitude serves as the organic link between the two. Really - it's what makes us human.

So, make this Thanksgiving a truly Happy Meal, and launch the pursuit of happiness with a Happy New Year of Gratitude Expressed Daily. After a while, you may find you don't need the research evidence to prove it works.


Wednesday, November 1, 2017

11/01/2017

"My Career in Manufacturing Is a Reality"

Quinebaug Valley Community College (QVCC) has launched a new Advanced Manufacturing Program that opened in the Advanced Manufacturing Center last year.  This skill is in high demand locally and paid internships are available at $12-$14 per hour, rising to $20 per hour after one year. Currently accepting only 50 students, enrollment fills quickly.  Registration is now open.
Advanced manufacturing provides opportunities for an innovative and creative career.  QVCC's program is nine months in duration, with 24 credits applied to an Associate Degree.  QVCC reports that 95% of their graduates in this program are employed, with many hired by manufacturing firms in the local area. 
An open house at QVCC is scheduled on November 15th during which visitors may tour the campus and gather information about the degree program.  Click here for more information.

Federal Law Requires Colleges to Provide 

Real Cost of Education


A federal law was passed several months ago that requires all college websites to provide an online tool called a net price calculator that is intended to give a more accurate estimate of real costs for students and families.  What it's not meant to do is provide "sticker shock" but rather a more realistic - albeit, estimated - view of costs for attendance.

website managed by the federal government that's labeled College Navigator - National Center for Educational Statistics (available in "Helpful Links" as well) already provides a good deal of this information. You can also search for this cost calculator by specific schools.  This is accessible at "Net Cost Calculator" under "Helpful Links".  

Using these tools may reveal that some schools which may appear to be out of reach may, in fact, be affordable if sufficient financial aid (based upon need) is provided. At any rate, the time invested in using these tools may reap the net effect of finding affordable options for higher education.


Tuition Break for Connecticut Residents 


Looking for a discount on college tuition? Well, the New England Board of Higher Education may have a program for you. Called the Regional Student Program (RSP) Tuition Break, this program is a partnership comprised of the public colleges and universities in New England that offers more than 700 undergraduate and graduate degree programs and provides a significant discount on regular out-of-state tuition rates to eligible students.

Here's how it works - residents of one New England state are eligible when they attend certain public colleges in the other five New England states and pursue majors not offered by public colleges in their home state. This means that a CT resident may enroll in an out-of-state public school in New England and pay what amounts to almost in-state tuition provided that the major pursued at the college is not one offered by any of the public colleges and universities in CT.

If interested (and why wouldn't you be?), you can find more information about the program as well as majors available elsewhere at Regional Student Program Tuition Break.

Early Opportunity Scholarships (EOS)


Here's how students can earn scholarships of a different sort by taking on the challenges offered right at EOSHS.

EOSHS has been, for several years now, offering University of Connecticut (UC) courses through the Early College Experience (ECE) Program.  The ECE Program offers several UC courses to high schools in CT provided that instructors teaching these courses are certified by the UC department offering the course(s).   With twenty-six UC courses in the EOS curriculum (the most offered among all high schools in CT – the average for CT high schools is 5.7 courses), eligible students are granted the opportunity to earn college credits while simultaneously fulfilling high school graduation requirements.  It's worth noting that EOSHS ranks #1 in the state among all high schools when comparing the number of ECE courses offered that fulfill the four general content areas in the UC requirements for graduation.  It’s not uncommon for students to complete 10 college credits while enrolled at EOSHS.  Many earn more than 20 credits, and some have banked as many as sixty.  

To put this in perspective, a typical yearly course load in college is thirty credits.  At UC, a year’s tuition is about $15000 (including mandatory student fees).  So, performing the math, thirty credits equal about $15000.  For EOS students, the cost is $0.  This is, in effect, a $15000 scholarship (excluding the costs of books which are provided for free to students – an additional $1500 in approximate savings) for any EOS student who earns 30 credits prior to graduation.  The savings could potentially triple to $40000 or more when these credits transfer to a private college or university. There are on average about 25 students who earn at least this many before receiving their EOS diplomas.  Also not included, by the way, is the money saved on room and board expenses.  It doesn’t necessarily mean that a student would have to complete college in three years instead of four.  Rather, the fourth year could be spent on graduate studies.  Or the student may choose to double major and do so without overloading on credits per semester.

Most all of these courses are transferable to all of the in-state public institutions and to most out-of-state public institutions as well.  Several private colleges and universities will also accept these credits, depending upon each school’s transfer credit policy.  For more information about the ECE Program, click here.

Adding to the ECE offerings from UConn are three ECSU courses and twelve MCC courses.  Students may carry these credits to several colleges as well.

There has been some debate about the relative merits of ECE courses when compared to Advanced Placement (AP) courses.  EOSHS does offer nine AP courses (AP Psychology, AP Spanish 4, AP French 4, AP German 4, AP Latin 4, AP Statistics, AP Studio Art, AP Chemistry, and AP Computer Science).  Credits are awarded in AP courses solely on the basis of performance on the three-hour AP exams administered in May while credits for ECE courses are given based upon final grades earned in the courses (students must earn at least a "C").  Although the most highly selective colleges do not cast an unfavorable view of schools with few AP courses (EOSHS, for many years, had none in its curriculum, choosing instead to offer only the ECE courses), these schools do expect applicants to enroll in at least one or two and take the AP exam(s) if schools do offer them.  AP courses have been the subject of much debate in recent years as critics have felt that these courses cover content that is "a mile wide and an inch deep", and the pace of the course does not offer in-depth, inquiry-based learning.  The College Board has heard this criticism and has responded to it by redesigning AP courses with less content and more opportunities for inquiry-based learning.

Anyway, AP courses or not, students at EOSHS have several opportunities to start college while still enrolled in high school.  And, in many cases, the courses offered at the school are much smaller than the large introductory classes offered on the UC campus.  The Region 19 School District has made an investment in this program.  It makes sense that students consider making an investment of their own time and energy in pursuit of these early opportunity scholarships.

A Short Video on 529 Plans for College Savings


Click here to view a very short video about the impact of 529 college savings plans on the FAFSA.  You'll be pleasantly surprised by the information.  

Save early.  It will help later on.

CT Dollars and Sense


A new website was launched several months ago that is called CT Dollars and Sense – a web portal for Connecticut students and parents to find out how to plan, save and pay for college.   Click here for more information.
The site provides information from five State agencies supporting students and their families: the Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET), the Connecticut Higher Education Supplemental Loan Authority (CHESLA), the Office of Higher Education, the Department of Banking, and the Department of Consumer Protection. There is also a Financial Literacy platform on the site that covers Paying for School, Managing Money, and Finding a Career.
Try it.

Sunday, October 15, 2017

10/15/2017

Registration Deadline Approaching for MCC Courses


Below is a list of courses offered at EOSHS that are eligible for MCC credits. Note that these credits may transfer to other colleges and universities.  The registration process opened on September 19th and closes on October 19th.  The registration process opens again on January 9th for MCC courses that students will complete in the second semester.  This second registration period will close on February 5th.  In order to be eligible to earn college credits, students MUST complete the application.

Accounting 1A (MCC ACC 115)
Human Anatomy & Physiology A (MCC BIO 115)
Intro to Criminal Justice (MCC CJS 101)
Video Productions 1 & 2 (MCC COM 240)
English 12A (MCC ENGL 101)
Allied Health (MCC HLT 103)
Tech-Prep Culinary Arts (MCC HSP 101)
Statistics B (MCC MAT 109)
Algebra 3 and Trigonometry (MCC MAT 138)
Personal Finance (MCC BFN 110)



In order to be enrolled in the CCP Program, students must first complete an online application.  This application is available by clicking here.

Returning CCP students who have previously applied and enrolled in MCC courses in the past do NOT need to apply again.

Students should contact their counselors if they need more information.


Financial Aid Workshop for Parents 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25


Much has been published in recent months about the financial aid process related to college costs.  Included in all of this is the announcement of a major change that the federal government introduced last year which is designed to provide more timely feedback to students and their parents/guardians.  The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) opened on October 1, three months earlier than in past years (January 1).  So parents/guardians will be able to use last year's (2016) tax returns when completing this form that is required by colleges and universities when families are seeking financial aid.

The EOSHS Guidance Department has scheduled a financial aid workshop at 7 pm on Wednesday, October 25th in the school lecture hall.  A representative from the Barnum Group, a financial organization that specializes in the financial aid process, will present information about the FAFSA, how the financial aid system can work for families, how colleges use tuition discounting as a tool in the admissions process, and how the CSS Profile differs from the FAFSA.  Additionally, time will be devoted for the representative to address questions from parents/guardians in attendance.

This workshop may be beneficial for parents/guardians of students in the lower grades (9, 10, 11) as well as for those who have seniors going through the college admissions process this year.


College Goals Sunday


Program Providing Free Assistance for FAFSA


Sunday, October 29
Eastern CT State University

1:00-4:00 pm

Need help working your way through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?  It's available.  See below.


The Connecticut College Goal Sunday (CGS) program is an effort by hundreds of volunteers from across Connecticut who will come together with the common goal of making sure that the process of applying for college financial aid does not become an obstacle that would keep any person from pursuing an education beyond high school. By attending a College Goal Sunday event, participants will receive free, hands-on assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and they will walk away with the satisfaction of knowing they have accomplished one of the biggest steps in getting ready to go to college. Connecticut’s CGS will take place at a number of accessible sites throughout the state. In addition to receiving assistance in filling out the FAFSA, participants will receive general information regarding financial aid programs.  


Click on the link for more information and other dates/locations.  
NOTE THAT YOU SHOULD REGISTER IN ADVANCE.
Contact below for more information 
Neville Brown
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Eastern CGS Site Coordinator
Phone: 860-465-4428; e-mail: brownn@easternct.edu


Step-by-Step Video Tutorial on Completing the FAFSA


Click here for a video tutorial that will "walk" you through completion of the FAFSA.  This video was constructed for residents of Utah but applies to all US citizens because the FAFSA is a federal form.


Is an Elite College Worth the Sticker Price?  

Should Common Cents Prevail?


Given a choice between a most selective college (read: Ivy League and the like) and State U (like UConn), which do you choose?  Although the former can cost major bucks, the standard theory is that the lofty price of a prestigious diploma will reap huge dividends in future earnings.  But not everyone agrees.  In fact, some who have worked the numbers can prove otherwise. 
Alan Krueger is an economist from Princeton University, one of those most selective schools.  He, along with Stacy Dale, a researcher at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, challenged the long-standing theory more than a few years back when then they published their research findings designed to answer this question - Does attendance at and graduation from an elite college pay off in higher earnings for graduates?  They concluded that it doesn’t.  Here’s why.
Although they may give the appearance of doing so, in reality, Krueger and Dale argued that the higher earnings accumulated by graduates of most selective schools are attributable to most selective individuals and not their college diplomas.  In other words, if you’re bright enough to gain admission to Harvard, you’re bright enough to earn lots of money, regardless of where you go to school (assuming that would be a major reason for attending a school like Harvard in the first place).
Still, there is lots of confusion surrounding this issue.  Several experts contend that Krueger and Dale are incorrect.  One such expert is Ronald Ehrenberg, Director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute, who claims that “on average, there is a significant gain in going to a top private school”, both in terms of admission to better graduate schools and in higher lifetime earnings.  Harvard economist Caroline Hoxby contends that student aptitude accounts for about two-thirds to three-quarters of the earnings difference.  Yet, even allowing for this, her findings indicate that it pays to attend the most selective college available to you.  Her work factors in what students actually pay (with free financial aid) and not the list price of college tuition.
So whom do you believe and then what do you do ( assuming the option is available)?  Well, the experts suggest that you take all this data for what it’s worth, and then apply a healthy dose of common sense to what works for you and your family members.  Clearly, it’s worth it to weigh the costs, especially in light of the heavy weight of student debt that families are currently carrying and graduates’ inability to move on in their adult lives.The bottom line should be net price and not sticker price.


Federal Law Requires Colleges to Provide Real Cost of Education


A federal law was passed a couple of years ago that requires all college websites to provide an online tool called a net price calculator that is intended to give a more accurate estimate of real costs for students and families.  It's not meant to provide "sticker shock" but rather a more realistic - albeit, estimated - view of costs for attendance.

website managed by the federal government that's labeled College Navigator - National Center for Educational Statistics (available in "Helpful Links" below as well) already provides a good deal of this information.  Another link - Big Future/Paying for College - is another useful link.  Using these tools may reveal that some schools which appear to be out of reach may, in fact, be affordable if sufficient financial aid (based upon need) is provided.  At any rate, the time invested in using these tools may reap the net effect of finding affordable options for higher education.

Test Optional


Several more colleges and universities have chosen to become "test-optional" institutions in recent months, meaning that students are given the option of submitting their SAT/ACT scores. On the surface, it may appear that these schools are making the claim that other measures are far more important to consider than some standardized test taken on some Saturday morning (or a school day now). In fact, this may be the case since research indicates that students who choose not to submit scores perform just as well in the college classrooms as those students who do submit scores. Of course, there are cynics who believe that there are other strategic reasons for implementing the "test-optional" policy.  

Either way, schools that implement this option give students who feel their test scores would diminish their chances for admission the choice to hold back their scores. For those students who wish to have their scores considered, they go ahead and submit them.

To read one take on this, click on Rigors and Rewards for Going Test Optional.  Another resource on this issue of fair testing is available under Helpful Links - National Center for Fair and Open Testing.

Sunday, October 1, 2017

10/01/2017

PSAT Registration Continues Until October 6


Registration for the PSAT continues this week. The PSAT is a practice SAT that is highly recommended for juniors in that it may serve as practice for the SAT they will take in March This new PSAT resembles the new SAT that The College Board rolled out in March 2016.  Sophomores who wish to take it should have already completed Geometry.  Sophomores should also take note that they will be offered the opportunity to take the PSAT for free in March 2018.

The test date is Wednesday, October 11th, and will be administered between 8-11:30 AM.  Students registering for the PSAT will be charged $16 and may pay this fee with a check made out to EOSHS. Registration takes place in the Guidance Office. The window for test registration will remain open until Friday, October 6th.  A late fee of $10 will be assessed after that date, provided room remains available for additional test-takers.

Juniors are eligible for National Merit Scholarships. Those students who score in the top half of the 99th percentile are typically selected as candidates for these scholarships. Their value has been $2500 and likely will remain so in the next year.  Aside from eligibility for these scholarships, the PSAT provides a testing experience that resembles the SAT, and students who complete the PSAT receive in early December a detailed summary of their test performances. This summary may be very useful when preparing for the SAT in March 2018.

Contact your counselor if you have questions about the PSAT.

College Goals Sunday


Program Providing Free Assistance for FAFSA


Sunday, October 29
Eastern CT State University

1:00-4:00 pm

Need help working your way through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?  It's available.  See below.


The Connecticut College Goal Sunday (CGS) program is an effort by hundreds of volunteers from across Connecticut who will come together with the common goal of making sure that the process of applying for college financial aid does not become an obstacle that would keep any person from pursuing an education beyond high school. By attending a College Goal Sunday event, participants will receive free, hands-on assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and they will walk away with the satisfaction of knowing they have accomplished one of the biggest steps in getting ready to go to college. Connecticut’s CGS will take place at a number of accessible sites throughout the state. In addition to receiving assistance in filling out the FAFSA, participants will receive general information regarding financial aid programs.  


Click on link  for more information and other dates/locations.


Financial Aid Workshop for Parents/Guardians Scheduled            on Wednesday, October 25th


Much has been published in recent months about the financial aid process related to college costs.  Included in all of this is the announcement of a major change that the federal government is introducing this year which is designed to provide more timely feedback to students and their parents/guardians.  The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) opens on October 1, three months earlier than in past years (January 1).  So parents/guardians will be able to use last year's (2016) tax returns when completing this form that is required by colleges and universities when families are seeking financial aid.

The EOSHS Guidance Department has scheduled a financial aid workshop at 7 pm on Wednesday, OCTOBER 25TH in the school auditorium.  A representative from the Barnum Group, a financial organization that specializes in the financial aid process, will present information about the FAFSA, how the financial aid system can work for families, how colleges use tuition discounting as a tool in the admissions process, and how the CSS Profile differs from the FAFSA.  Additionally, time will be devoted for the representative to address questions from parents/guardians in attendance.

This workshop may be beneficial for parents/guardians of students in the lower grades (9, 10, 11) as well as for those who have seniors going through the college admissions process this year.


Regional Tuition Discount Program 

Offers Affordable Options


Here's how it works - residents of one New England state are eligible when they attend certain public colleges in the other five New England states and pursue majors not offered by public colleges in their home state.  This means that a CT resident may enroll in an out-of-state public school in New England and pay what amounts to almost in-state tuition provided that the major pursued at the college is not one offered by any of the public colleges and universities in CT.

If interested, you can find more information about the program as well as majors available elsewhere at Regional Student Program Tuition Break.  



Below is a recent announcement made public by the RSP.

"As you advise students and families about their college and financial aid options, we encourage you to provide information on NEBHE's New England Regional Student Program (RSP), also known as Tuition Break.

The program will be relevant to students who find that their intended program of study is not offered by the University of Connecticut, Connecticut State University campuses or the Connecticut community colleges.

The RSP provides a tuition break to Connecticut residents, who are enrolled in approved degree programs at public colleges and universities in the five other New England states. 

In some cases, students may also be eligible under the Proximity Policy option (available at certain colleges, when they live closer to an out-of-state college).

During the 2015-16 academic year, over 1,500 Connecticut residents were enrolled under the RSP and saved an estimated $10.3 million on their annual tuition bills. Students enrolled full-time saved an average of $7,774.  


Financial Aid: How It Works

Several individuals have been inquiring about financial aid and, more specifically, scholarships that are allegedly "out there" like untapped oil reserves. So, this entry will attempt to address the money issue related to the cost of higher education.

Let's start with a brief description of what financial aid looks like. This aid typically is "packaged" in a combination of three sources - grants (free money provided by the schools), loans (money for "rent", usually subsidized by the federal government and with low-interest rates), and work-study opportunities (employment on campus). Combined, this "package" is supposed to meet the gap between what a family is expected to pay (called expected family contribution - "EFC") and the sticker price for attendance at a particular school. So, for instance, if school X costs $50,000 and your EFC is $25,000, then the financial aid package should amount to somewhere in the vicinity of the difference ($25,000). On the other hand, if School Y costs $25,000 (usually a public institution), then there may be no financial aid package provided - unless merit money is offered. Not all schools offer full coverage of the difference. In this case, families may tap into home equity or other sources (including personal bank loans) to close the gap. Grants, by the way, come in two forms - money based upon demonstrated need and money that is merit-based (earned by virtue of a student's academic achievement and/or SAT scores that meet established criteria set by the schools).

How is the EFC determined? Well, almost every school requires families to submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This application is submitted to the government, now available on October 1 as noted above.  The information provided is based upon the previous year's tax records.  Some schools also require families to submit the CCS Profile available at The College Board website (click here). Either or both form(s) is/are then sent to the schools to which one's child has applied and the Financial Aid Office at each school then calculates a financial aid package. It's not a precise science and, thus, aid packages may differ by school. It's not unusual for these aid packages to differ according to the degree to which each school would like the student to matriculate and/or the degree to which a school meets demonstrated need.  Use the Net Price Calculator listed under "Links to Financial Aid" on the left of this page to get an estimate of the costs to attend specific colleges.  These costs may differ based on the formulas used by each school.

Local scholarships are available and these are generally announced sometime between March and June. The Guidance Department lists scholarship opportunities on the Naviance site. This may be accessed in the "Parent" portion of the EOS web site. As for those other scholarships "out there", FastWeb  is one website that is reputable. There are several scams that fool too many people looking for "free" money. One such site is https://www.fafsa-application.com. DON'T USE IT. THE SITE YOU SHOULD USE IS here.  For more links, look to the left of this page under Financial Aid.

There may be "oil" to discover, but you may also need to do lots of drilling down into the data mine to unearth it.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

09/15/2017

Be sure to click on "web version" at the bottom of your screen if you're accessing this site on a mobile device.


FINAL DATE TO SUBMIT FORMS FOR ECSU CREDITS IN AD HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY, CALCULUS A, AND MATH FOR LIBERAL ARTS IS TOMORROW, SEPTEMBER 14.  COST IS $100 PER COURSE.  CHECKS SHOULD BE MADE OUT TO EOSHS AND SUBMITTED BY 2 PM TOMORROW.


Registration Process for MCC Courses


Much has been reported in recent weeks about the partnership that exists with EOSHS and UConn.  It should be noted that EOSHS has developed a strong relationship with Manchester Community College (MCC) as well.  This relationship has been formed through the College Career Pathways Program.

College Career Pathways (CCP) is a collaborative program between area high schools and Manchester Community College (MCC).  It's designed to allow high school students to sample the challenge of college-level work and earn college credits while attending high school.  The CCP courses meet the same level of challenge taught at the college level and, in fact, are taught by EOS teachers who have been certified by MCC.  Students earn "dual credit" (credits from EOSHS and credits from MCC).

Below is a list of courses offered at EOSHS that are eligible for MCC credits.  Note that these credits may transfer to other colleges and universities.  The registration process opens on September 19th and closes on October 19th.   The registration process opens again on January 9th for MCC courses that students will complete in the second semester.  This second registration period will close on February 5th.  In order to be eligible to earn college credits, students MUST complete the application.

Accounting 1A (MCC ACC 115)
Financial Literacy (BFN 111)
Human Anatomy & Physiology A (MCC BIO 115)
Intro to Criminal Justice (MCC CJS 101)
Video Productions 1 & 2 (MCC COM 166)
English 12A (MCC ENGL 101)
Tech-Prep Culinary Arts (MCC HSP 101)
Statistics B (MCC MAT 109)
Algebra 3 and Trigonometry (MCC MAT 138)


In order to be enrolled in the CCP Program, students must first complete an on-line application.  This application is available by clicking here.

Returning CCP students who have previously applied and enrolled in MCC courses in the past do NOT need to apply again.

Students should contact their counselors if they need more information.

PSAT Registration Begins This Week


Registration for the PSAT begins next week (Monday, 9/18). The PSAT is a practice SAT that is highly recommended for juniors in that it may serve as practice for the SAT they will take in March This new PSAT resembles the new SAT that The College Board rolled out in March 2016.  Sophomores who wish to take it should have already completed Geometry.  Sophomores should also take note that they will be offered the opportunity to take the PSAT for free in March 2018.

The test date is Wednesday, October 11th, and will be administered between 8-11:30 AM.  Students registering for the PSAT will be charged $16 and may pay this fee with a check made out to EOSHS. Registration takes place in the Guidance Office. The window for test registration will remain open until Friday, October 6th. A late fee of $10 will be assessed after that date, provided room remains available for additional test-takers.

Juniors are eligible for National Merit Scholarships. Those students who score in the top half of the 99th percentile are typically selected as candidates for these scholarships. Their value has been $2500 and likely will remain so in the next year.  Aside from eligibility for these scholarships, the PSAT provides a testing experience that resembles the SAT, and students who complete the PSAT receive in early December a detailed summary of their test performances. This summary may be very useful when preparing for the SAT in March 2018.

Contact your counselor if you have questions about the PSAT.

Adding/Dropping Courses


With two weeks of school already in the books, students may still be weighing their course loads and determining what's appropriate to carry.  Anyone wishing to make a schedule change will need to complete a "Schedule Change Request Form" that is available in the Guidance Office. This form will require both a teacher signature (course being dropped) and a parent/guardian signature before the change can be processed. The completed form should be brought to the student's counselor.

For the record, students should know that semester courses (designated by S1 or S2) and year-long courses (designated by YR) have different time lines for adding/dropping classes and how these changes are depicted on transcripts. For first semester courses, students have twenty (20) school days to decide before changes are reflected on transcripts. In other words, any changes made before the 20-day window will NOT be reflected on transcripts. Changes after the 20-day period but before the end of the first marking period will show a "W" (withdrawal) on the transcript. For year-long courses, the timeline is doubled.

Updating ECE Registration


The Add/Drop period for UConn ECE began on August 15th and will continue until September 29th.  If you have not yet applied, see below.

  • Go to this link and review the online steps.  Once ready, hit "Apply Now".
  • Create your user ID and password and save in a secure location.
  • Complete the online application.
  • Upload your signed consent form with your application.  If you are unable to upload the form (you may scan it or take a picture of it before uploading it), contact the helpline at 1.855.382.8323.
  • Monitor your email daily for a message from UConn confirming your application has been processed and you are ready to enroll.  You will be unable to enroll in your course(s) until your application is processed.  Please allow at least a few days for your application to be processed during peak periods.  
If you are already in the ECE database (having registered and received confirmation via email) and you need to add or drop courses, see below.

  • Once your enrollment notification is received, follow the link to enroll in your course(s).
  • Select your high school and the approved course(s) listed on your consent form.  Follow the directions until submission is complete.
  • Contact your counselor if you need more information.

A Message to Seniors


Seniors should make appointments with their counselors as soon as possible to continue discussions about plans for life after graduation in June.  There are several important tasks that seniors need to complete in a time-sensitive fashion and counselors will help with this process.


Raising Resilient Children


It's possible to raise children with an intent to make them more resilient.  This involves active parenting that requires at least three driving principles.  Click here to learn about these three principles.

Ten Facts About Postsecondary Plans for Class of 2017


Do you have any interest in finding out about where graduates of the Class of 2017 are now?  Click here to get ten facts about these students.  Learn about the decisions they made regarding their post-secondary plans and where they chose to pursue their interests.